Handling Tough Questions with Great Answers – The Commonality between Dating and Job Interview


 

“What are your weaknesses?”

  • No “correct” answer
  • Don’t share weaknesses related to the job at hand
  • Take a weakness and put a positive spin on it
  • Tell the employer how you’re improving upon it
  • Don’t give a strength disguised as a weakness (for example, “I am a perfectionist.”)

“Why did you leave your last job?”

  • Employers want to see if you’ll talk badly about your former employer
  • Don’t give into the temptation!
  • Even if you left for negative reasons, an interview is not the proper place to share dirt about your last employer
  • Stay professional
  • Great answer:“The cultural fit wasn’t right for me at that organization. This company would be much better because of [something in the culture you’ve researched].”

“Tell me about yourself.”

  • Keep your answer concise but comprehensive
  • A prepared elevator speech (30-to 60-second pitch about yourself) is a great tool to use for answering this question
  • Talk about accomplishments, traits, education and experience
  • Resist the urge to drone on and on –the interviewer will be asking more questions. No need to share your life story!

“Tell me about the worst boss you’ve ever had.”

  • Again, resist the temptation to divulge dirt on past experiences
  • Don’t vent frustrations
  • Great answer: “I’ve had all types of bosses, and some were much better than others at managing and communication.” It’s broad enough so you don’t come across as unprofessional, but still answers the question

“Why should I hire you?”

  • To answer this question, you need to have a strong handle on your fit at the organization—which requires some research
  • Perhaps you see that the organization lacks a clear marketing strategy, something you have experience in creating and implementing
  • Depending on what you find and your unique selling points, answer confidently and show the hiring manager how you will benefit the organization if they hire you
  • Talk about past accomplishments
  • Make them want to hire you

“Give me an example of a time when you had to [work in a team, think on your feet, work with a difficult client, etc.]…”

  • This is where the accomplishment stories in your cover letter and resume can come in handy
  • The worst thing you can do when asked to give an example of something is to panic and fail to come up with one
  • Come prepared with several stories that you can share about past experiences to show that you are capable in a variety of situations

“Where do you see yourself in five years?”

  • Show that you’ve thought about sticking around the company and possibly moving up in the organization.
  • However, don’t say you see yourself in your interviewer’s position!
  • Discuss how your skills and traits can help you excel at the current position and benefit the company in the future
  • Don’t share anything too personal, such as plans to start a family or travel the world, which could take you out of the running for the job

DOs & DON’Ts

DO be courteous and respectful of every employee at the organization

  • You make your first impression at the receptionist or secretary
  • Make it a positive one!

DO bring extra resumesand/or your portfolio to the interview

  • The hiring manager might not have a copy in front of them or it could get lost in the shuffle
  • Your portfolio is a great tool to use to share examples of past work

DO give detailed examples along with your answers

  • Use accomplishment stories, past work assignments and projects and workplace situations to explain your point

DON’T answer questions in one word

  • A simple “yes” or “no” often isn’t enough explanation

DON’T inquire about salary/benefits/vacation/ etc.

  • There’s an appropriate time and place for this—and it’s not during your initial interview

DO ask for the interviewer’s business card and hand them one of your own.

  • This ensures you have the proper spelling of their name, their email address and telephone number

DO be honest and be yourself

  • Don’t exaggerate or lie during the interview
  • The hiring manager will likely find out and you’ll diminish your chances at landing the job

DO ask great questions

  • It shows your interest in the organization
  • It conveys passion about the opening

DO close the interview telling the interviewer(s) you want the job and asking about next steps

  • This helps to determine when you should follow-up and gives you a general sense of the timeline for the opening

DO write a thank you card after to the interview

  • Genuinely thank the employer for their time
  • Reiterate things you spoke about during the interview

Pin ItFollow Me on Pinterest

Mine the Links for the real Gems

How you, the hiring manager, can use social-media networks to support your recruiting efforts and pick winners.

- Brand yourself as an employer of choice

- Look beyond the referral

- Check status updates

- Check for thought leadership

- The power of networking

- Narrowing your search

- Targeting different levels

- Forming alliances

For the details of this article, please look out for Human Resources Magazine, August 2010 issue, page 47.

Pin ItFollow Me on Pinterest

What Single Women want

What Single Women want

®Copyright MediaCorp

By Melissa Tan

Trade one’s independence for a husband and motherhood?

There are some who may scoff at the idea.

But there are also many single Singaporean women who are looking for love, but haven’t quite found it yet.

So just what do single women want these days?

35 year old Miss Goh says she will keep looking for Mr Right till she turns 40.

Although she has met men whom she has clicked with, Mr Right is yet to come by.

“For me, chemistry is very important. And after chemistry it will be the personality, the financial stability, so on and so forth. But it always turns out that the one I have chemistry with always turns out to be the wrong type of guy, who is not suitable or who is not actually looking to settle down.”

I asked Miss Goh what type of man she is looking for.

” Somebody who is responsible, capable and basically a family man.”

Some may say she is fussy, and to a certain extent, she believes she is.

“I will not get married just to get married. I think I will join and get support from my single friends. I guess friends and career does help.”

35 year old Min Zhen, who is also single, says her perception of what a stable relationship entails has changed over the years.

” At this age, I guess we are more mature, we are also more independent, so our criteria when we are looking for a life partner differs very very hugely from when we are 25.  I would say that I would prefer to depend on my man, not the other way round, or at par. So if this gentleman, he has a good heart, a good character and a stable career, then I would look forward to settling down with him. But say if he is not stable in his career for example, then I will not consider.”

A recent survey conducted by dating agency Table for Six, showed that single women are quite often attracted to the wrong men.

23 percent of the respondents felt that way.

But Miss MinZhen and Miss Goh say most of the men they meet and are attracted to are already spoken for.

” Probably at my age, most of the guys who are my age or older are married. This is one of the factors in that sense.”

“And also, talking about men of our same age, 30, 35 or even 38, most of them are already attached, because men don’t believe in marrying late I think.”

But Miss MinZhen adds age should not be a barrier.

” As long as you are not looking to give birth, at that age I think you are fine. And I think there are people, not necessarily local men, there are people who don’t mind getting married at that age, just for companionship.”

Andrew Chow, founder of Table for Six, says his dating agency has always seen a demand for single men above the age of 35.

” But unfortunately we are not always able to find the right match, for the guys in terms of age. Because most guys of this age will be looking for younger women.”

His agency advises the women to revisit their requirements and consider someone younger.

“Because women who are 35, 40, 45, at a certain age they do prefer younger men. Trouble is, we need to find younger men who appreciate older women. I think there is a trend where younger men are going with older women. I see that even in the younger age bracket of between 25 and 30 years old. It seems that the women are now on average two to four years older than their male counterparts.”

The survey also found that 55 percent of single women will give up looking for a life partner by the age of 40.

One reason for this may be they then face less social pressure to get married.

Table for Six’s Andrew.

” Honestly, if you ask me, I think there has been a shift in the last three, four years. I think the pressure to get married is not as strong as say 2005. Nowadays women they have other back up plans, they have lots of other options to keep them gainfully engaged in life, other than a life partner. Women are quite happy, even if they have to stay single. They won’t settle for second best.”

Lydia Gan is the Owner of Clique Wise, a dating agency that runs social events for singles every weekend.

” Nowadays people just accept it that if you don’t get married, then maybe it’s a choice la. But in the past it wasn’t a choice. At least nowadays we still can say oh I haven’t found the right one, I choose to be single… people still respect that.”

The survey showed that 24 percent would look to engage in social work should they not find a life partner.

Another 22 percent said they would probably work past their retirement age, and 13 percent said that would find a companion with no marriage in mind.

So with women becoming more independent financially and otherwise, perhaps it is no surprise that many say that they can find meaningful ways to engage themselves – with or without a married partner.

Just like MinZhen.

“I’m an individual who can earn my own keep. If I can’t find a life partner, then so be it. I have lots and lots of friends. Even the married ones, we do catch up once in a while, so its not a big deal.”

Click here to hear it on podcast

Pin ItFollow Me on Pinterest

Interviewed by International Celebrity Host – Ian Wright for Discovery Channel

Discovery Channel was in Singapore to do a 10-day story and the last episode is about “Finding Mr Right”.

Table For Six LLP was honored to be approached to be featured and interviewed for our singles gathering – “Extreme Speed Dating”.

The Program will be out in Nov/Dec 2010 on Discovery Channel. See how I spar with Ian Wright, one of the most beloved host in the world.

Espressoul Cafe was the proud sponsor of the event and kudos to Mr Danny Pang, the Founder of the Cafe chain

See Danny’s blog here – http://blog.omy.sg/ezprezzo/2010/05/19/coffee-and-singles/

Pin ItFollow Me on Pinterest

Social Development Workshop – Part 3 (23 Jan 2010)

5 Relationship Compatibility Time Bombs (CBTs)

This is third of 3 weeks of Personal Development Workshop for an Anglican church, about 30 youth between 21 to 28 years old were gathered to learn basic principles of dating.

[slideshare id=4597895&doc=5relationshipcompatibilitytimebombs-100623231845-phpapp01]

Pin ItFollow Me on Pinterest

Social Development Workshop – Part 2 (16 Jan 2010)

8 Types Of Relationships Which Wont Work

This is second of 3 weeks of Personal Development Workshop for an Anglican church, about 30 youth between 21 to 28 years old were gathered to learn basic principles of dating.

[slideshare id=2972701&doc=8typesofrelationshipswhichwontwork-100122092403-phpapp01]

Pin ItFollow Me on Pinterest

Social Development Workshop – Part 1 (9 Jan 2010)

7 Qualities To Look For in a Partner

This is first of 3 weeks of Personal Development Workshop for an Anglican church, about 30 youth between 21 to 28 years old were gathered to learn basic principles of dating.

[slideshare id=3632796&doc=7qualitiestolookfor-100404065441-phpapp01]

Pin ItFollow Me on Pinterest

Passion People – Interview by 938live

460>_2014945
A personal brand is a unique set of attributes or characteristics that differentiate you from others These characteristics can be ‘functional’ (like having a particular degree or proficiency in typing) or ‘perceived’ (like being a go-getter or thought leader) Remember, ‘unique’ means that there aren’t lots more like you! This is a 10-min interview on Radio 938Live on April 2009 on the topic of my Passion under the Passion People segment.
Listen or Download my Interview here.
Pin ItFollow Me on Pinterest